Research for CARP

Academic and Institutional Research for CARP

The Division of Undergraduate Education and Academic Planning Tutoring Services (CARP and the LAC) frequently collaborate with the Office of Academic and Institutional Research to examine the impact of their programs and services on the SF State community. The following are reports generated by AIR that focus on, or include, analysis of CARP’s services.

Tutoring services at SF State: Testing the impact of LAC and CARP on student grades(PDF)Opens in a new window

AIR conducted a study in November 2014 that analyzed the LAC and CARP’s impacts on SF State student grades in a number of mathematics and writing courses. The study focused on a sample of students who had similar SAT scores for the math and/or verbal sections. Within this sample of students, the Office of AIR compared the mean grades of students who received tutoring in comparison to the grades of students who did not receive tutoring. The Office of AIR found that there were not vast differences between the mean grades for students who received tutoring and the mean grades for students who did not receive tutoring. Based on these results, the Office of AIR indicated that the LAC and CARP had a successful impact on student grades.

CARP Tutoring at SF State: Testing the Impact of CARP on Student Retention(PDF)Opens in a new window

In Spring 2015, AIR examined the 1-year retention rates of students who received tutoring at CARP in comparison to the 1-year retention rates of the general student population. Students who accessed tutoring at CARP were assumed to have some degree of difficulty in succeeding in their courses (or were anticipating some degree of difficulty), and were assumed to have a higher risk of non-retention. AIR found that when controlling for variables such as age, gender, and ethnicity, there was no significant difference between retention rates of students who received tutoring at CARP and the general student population. AIR suggests that CARP likely increases the retention rate of students who are at a higher risk of not being retained.

CARP Tutoring at SF State: Measuring CARP's Impact on Student Confidence(PDF)Opens in a new window

In Fall 2015, AIR analyzed a one-time budget increase given to CARP to measure student confidence. Utilizing Candace Shoemaker’s previous study, CARP offered pre and post surveys to students seeking tutoring. Differing from performance in their classes, the surveys showed that students who received tutoring at CARP felt a greater sense of confidence in approaching their class material. Although the connection between confidence and academic performance was not directly measured, AIR relied on Shoemaker’s model to suggest that CARP tutoring aided academic performance in the students’ particular classes.